RESOURCE

Girls RISE Resources Directory

The Girls RISEnet resource catalog is a dynamic listing of crowd-sourced research and resources on engaging girls in engineering. Registered members of girlsrisenet.org can contribute resources through the "My Account" link above. If you are not a member of the site, please contact us to submit or suggest an addition.

2013 | By: Laura Reasoner Jones

GEMS club web site

Web site for girls, parents and teachers interested in helping girls become and stay interested in STEMView External Website


Region: Mid Atlantic

Contributor: Laura Reasoner Jones

Tags: Web resources, science, technology, math, science, elementary, middle school

2013 | By: Gabriela A. Gonzalez

Hermanas Facebook Page

"Hermanas: DiseƱa Tu Futuro" is a STEM outreach program for under-represented middle and high school girls. Its mission is to increase the number of underrepresented female students choosing to go to college by inspiring them to pursue an education in a STEM field. This is a program originated by Intel Corporation in collaboration with the Maricopa Community College District and Portland Community College. Please join us on Facebook to learn more about this program and connect to valuable resources.View External Website


Region: N South Atlantic

Contributor: Gabriela A. Gonzalez

Tags: latinas, STEM, girls, engineering, Hispanic, latina, middle school, high school, outreach, K-12, education

2013 | By: Roxanne M. Hughes et al

The Single Sex Debate for Girls in Science: A Comparison Between Two Informal Science Programs

The Single Sex Debate for Girls in Science: a Comparison Between Two Informal Science Programs on Middle School Students' STEM Identity Formation---------- Abstract: Currently, there are policy debates regarding the efficacy and legality of single sex formal and informal education programs. This issue is particularly poignant in science education due to the historical marginalization of women in these fields. This marginalization has resulted in women being positioned as a stigmatized group within many science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) related fields. Research points to adolescence as the age where this sense of marginalization begins to develop. As a result, policy responses have utilized various frameworks such as: increased access for women, changing pedagogy to address women's learning styles, changing the language and culture of science to prevent marginalization of stigmatized groups, and finally exploring the role that individual identity plays in the margin- alization of women. This study adds to the policy debate as it applies to single sex education by comparing middle school participants' STEM identity formation during two informal science learning environments (an all girls STEM camp and a co- educational STEM camp). Additionally, this study focuses on the influence of camp activities within two informal science education programs: particularly the provision of role models and authentic STEM research activities, as means to improve STEM identity and make these fields relevant to the lives of middle school students. The results indicate that both camps improved girls' STEM identities. These findings suggest that the single sex environment is not as important to STEM identity as the pedagogy used within the program. (Published January 2013)View External Website


Region: N South Atlantic

Contributor: Ta-Shana Taylor

Tags: middle school, gender, program model, girl-friendly instructional strategies

2013 | By: Angela Calabrese Barton et. al

Crafting a Future in Science: Tracing Middle School Girls' Identity Work Over Time and Space

The underrepresentation of girls from nondominant backgrounds in the sciences and engineering continues despite recent gains in achievement. This longitudinal ethnographic study traces the identity work that girls from nondominant backgrounds do as they engage in science-related activities across school, club, and home during the middle school years. Building a conceptual argument for identity trajectories, the authors discuss the ongoing, cumulative, and contentious nature of identity work and the mechanisms that foster critical shifts in trajectories. The authors argue that the girls view possible future selves in science when their identity work is recognized, supported, and leveraged toward expanded opportunities for engagement in science. This process yields layered meanings of (possible) selves and of science and reconfigures meaningful participation in science. (February 2013)View External Website


Region: S South Atlantic

Contributor: Ta-Shana Taylor

Tags: gender, science instructional strategies, equity, middle school

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Science Central's Ms. Tech Camp

With support from a Girls RISEnet Minigrant, Science Central, a hands-on science center in northeast Indiana, partnered with the Boys and Girls Club of Fort Wayne and the Fort Wayne Urban League, as well as the general public, to host our first ...Read More

Privacy Policy | The Girls RISE (Raising Interest in Science and Engineering) National Museum Network is funded by Grant No. HRD-0937245 from the National Science Foundation (NSF), Human Resource Development, Research on Gender in Science and Engineering Extension Services (GSE/EXT) Program. Project collaborators include the Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science, the Association of Science-Technology Centers (ASTC) and SECME, Inc. The project seeks to increase the capacity of science centers and museums to interest girls from underrepresented populations in the engineering sciences