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Girls RISE Resources Directory

The Girls RISEnet resource catalog is a dynamic listing of crowd-sourced research and resources on engaging girls in engineering. Registered members of girlsrisenet.org can contribute resources through the "My Account" link above. If you are not a member of the site, please contact us to submit or suggest an addition.

2014 | By: Greg Thompson

The Maker Movement Conquers the Classroom

A hands-on approach to STEM engages students, but how does project-based learning connect with standardized testing? 04/30/14 View External Website


Region: S South Atlantic

Contributor: Ta-Shana Taylor

Tags: instructional strategies, technology/computer science, technology/computer science instructional strategies, informal education

2014 | By: Cindy Perman

The Best (And Worst) Jobs for 2014

CareerCast is out with their annual ranking of the 10 best and 10 worst jobs for 2014, and let's just say that math and science guys everywhere are about to high-five. April 19, 2014View External Website


Region: S South Atlantic

Contributor: Ta-Shana Taylor

Tags: workforce, careers, STEM

2014 | By: Kyle Kensing

The Best Jobs of 2014

For a mathematician like Jessika Sobanski of San Diego, numbers unlock a world of career possibilities. “There’s a huge, huge range of opportunities for mathematicians,” says Sobanski. “Some can go the education route, but there's much more.” Hiring demand also is very high among corporations, government agencies and the non-profit world, she says. In fact, the field’s versatility is a primary reason it outscored the competition and ranks No. 1 in our 2014 Jobs Rated report. View External Website


Region: S South Atlantic

Contributor: Ta-Shana Taylor

Tags: workforce, careers, STEM

2014 | By: Daniel Voyer and Susan D. Voyer

Gender Differences In Scholastic Achievement: A Meta-Analysis

A female advantage in school marks is a common finding in education research, and it extends to most course subjects (e.g., language, math, science), unlike what is found on achievement tests. However, questions remain concerning the quantification of these gender differences and the identification of relevant moderator variables. The present meta-analysis answered these questions by examining studies that included an evaluation of gender differences in teacher-assigned school marks in elementary, junior/middle, or high school or at the university level (both undergraduate and graduate). The final analysis was based on 502 effect sizes drawn from 369 samples. A multilevel approach to meta-analysis was used to handle the presence of nonindependent effect sizes in the overall sample. This method was complemented with an examination of results in separate subject matters with a mixed-effects metaanalytic model. A small but significant female advantage (mean d  0.225, 95% CI [0.201, 0.249]) was demonstrated for the overall sample of effect sizes. Noteworthy findings were that the female advantage was largest for language courses (mean d  0.374, 95% CI [0.316, 0.432]) and smallest for math courses (mean d  0.069, 95% CI [0.014, 0.124]). Source of marks, nationality, racial composition of samples, and gender composition of samples were significant moderators of effect sizes. Finally, results showed that the magnitude of the female advantage was not affected by year of publication, thereby contradicting claims of a recent “boy crisis” in school achievement. The present meta-analysis demonstrated the presence of a stable female advantage in school marks while also identifying critical moderators. Implications for future educational and psychological research are discussed. Voyer, D., & Voyer, S. D. (2014, April 28). Gender Differences in Scholastic Achievement: A Meta-Analysis. Psychological Bulletin. Advance online publication. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0036620235_Gender_Trends_in_Math_Science.pdf


Region: S South Atlantic

Contributor: Ta-Shana Taylor

Tags: women, diversity, minorities, student assessment, research/report/data

2014 | By: Jonathan Eisen

STEM Women: How Men Can Help, With Professor Jonathan Eisen

Last week, STEM Women launched our YouTube Channel. We’ll be hosting a fortnightly Hangout on Air series that is live streamed every second Sunday. Our show will cover four major themes: In the Spotlight: Highlights women’s careers in STEM; STEM Parents: Advice on how to encourage young girls interested in studying STEM subjects; Finding Solutions: Organisations & programs that actively target recruitment, retention & promotion of women; and How Men Can Help: Practical ways that men can support gender inclusion from junior to senior levels. Our first guest was Professor Jonathan Eisen who chatted about how male academics can help better recruit, retain, and include their women colleagues. Jonathan is a molecular biologist at University of California (UC) Davis. He’s also the Academic Editor-in-Chief for PLOS Biology. On his blog and social media, as well as through his professional activities, Jonathan is a passionate advocate of gender equality in STEM. Below is a summary of our discussion, centred on gender diversity and participation within academic conferences. February 26, 2014View External Website


Region: S South Atlantic

Contributor: Ta-Shana Taylor

Tags: women/mujeres, gender, disparities/stereotypes

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Science Central's Ms. Tech Camp

With support from a Girls RISEnet Minigrant, Science Central, a hands-on science center in northeast Indiana, partnered with the Boys and Girls Club of Fort Wayne and the Fort Wayne Urban League, as well as the general public, to host our first ...Read More

Privacy Policy | The Girls RISE (Raising Interest in Science and Engineering) National Museum Network is funded by Grant No. HRD-0937245 from the National Science Foundation (NSF), Human Resource Development, Research on Gender in Science and Engineering Extension Services (GSE/EXT) Program. Project collaborators include the Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science, the Association of Science-Technology Centers (ASTC) and SECME, Inc. The project seeks to increase the capacity of science centers and museums to interest girls from underrepresented populations in the engineering sciences