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Hidden Currents In The STEM Pipeline

"Hidden Currents In The STEM Pipeline: Insights From The Dyschronous Life Episodes Of A Minority Female STEM Teacher" ABSTRACT: In this article, I use the idea of dyschrony to describe the multiple disjunctures experienced in a Hispanic woman’s life as she struggled to gain full membership in the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) com- munity. Despite having earned a doctoral degree in chemistry and a teaching position in a STEM school, she was cognizant of how gender and race had marginalized her and her minority fe- male students, making them feel like border members of the STEM community. She had formed a solidarity group within the STEM school. As I apply the construct of dyschrony to analyze the in-depth interviews with the teacher, I illuminate tensions in the STEM pipeline and suggest that one should be critical about the promise of social mobility. The forming of solidarity groups may contribute to positive experiences of minority girls in STEM schools. Dyschrony may be used as a helpful analytic construct to unpack the forces contributing to minority women’s struggles in STEM fields and understand why they might leave.

Author RISEnet Member Contributor
Tang Wee Teo Ta-Shana Taylor
Date Tags
February 27, 2014 cultural competence, minorities, gender, disparities/stereotype
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